English Country House Libraries (Page 12)

3571
The English Country House; Miers

The Library at Newby Hall in Yorkshire. The house was built around 1690, likely by Christopher Wren, and the neoclassical interiors were done by Robert Adam between 1767 and 1774. The Library was originally designed by Adam as a dining room in 1767, but was converted into use as a library in 1807. The magnificent ceiling features a series of recessed and relief panels centered on an oval painting of Bacchus. Corinthian columns frame the main area of the large room.

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3572
Scotland's Lost Houses; Gow

The library at Hamilton Palace in Lanarkshire, Scotland. At one time the largest house in Scotland, it was torn down in 1919. The mid-19th-century library served as the main and most comfortable (if somewhat gloomy) sitting room of the Palace. It was a sumptuously-appointed space: large, pilastered bookcases with extravagant single pieces of sheet glass covering each case and the expensive books housed within, a massive chimney-piece of Egyptian porphyry and a rock crystal chandelier. The black and white photo doesn't show the crimson color of the carpet and upholstery. The extravagance of a bygone era.

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3573
Scotland's Lost Houses; Gow

The east compartment of the library at Abercairney in Perthshire, Scotland. Built in the early 19th century in Gothic-Revival style, the house was destroyed in the late 1950s. The portrait over the fireplace is of Colonel James Moray, the owner of the house when it was built.

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3574
Scottish Houses and Gardens; Gow

The library at Newhailes in Midlothian, Scotland.  Built onto the original, Neo-Palladian villa of 1686, the library, occupying its own large wing, was completed in about 1720. The character of the room was originally of a sober, learned nature, but slowly changed over the years. First, the stucco decorations were added to the chimney-breast around 1743. By 1873, the elaborate chandeliers had been added and the room was called the Drawing Room. Faded oriental carpets and tapestry-covered armchairs furnished the space just before the First World War when this photo was taken. Happily, the house still survives.

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3575
The Search for a Style; Cornforth

The library at Little Ridge in Wiltshire, England. The house was built in 1904 from the remains of an old manor house nearby, in an Arts & Crafts style. The library had well-designed proportions with nicely-crafted recessed bookcases, paneling, ceiling beams and classical pilasters on either side of the marble fireplace. Simply but comfortably furnished, it would have been a lovely place for reading. It was torn down in 1972 because the owner wished to build a neo-Georgian house on the site, the last English country house to be deliberately destroyed. A shame.

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3576
porymenohi.blog.com
The Regency Country House; Robinson

The Library at Arundel Castle in Sussex, England, designed and built in 1800 by the 11th Duke of Norfolk. Made of carved Honduran mahogany, the grand, two-story room retains its original design and has been called the finest surviving Regency interior anywhere in the world. The furniture, carpet and draperies have been restored to those created for Queen Victoria's visit of 1846. Alas, most of the volumes once housed in the shelves have been sold off and only a fraction remain.

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3577
The Regency Country House; Robinson

The library at Stratfield Saye in Hampshire, England. The manor house from much earlier times was enlarged around 1630, and the library dates from about 1740, thought to be designed by architect William Kent. The house was given to the 1st Duke of Wellington in 1817, in gratitude for defeating Napolean and was extensively enlarged and improved at that time. Many of the books in the library's handsome Regency bookcases belonged to the 1st Duke, who loved books. The library was "enhanced" (perhaps electricity was added?) in 1947.

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3578
The Regency Country House; Robinson

The library at Barnsley Park in Gloucestershire, England. The house was finished in 1731. The library is in a bow-windowed room that previously had been a salon, and was re-decorated by John Nash around 1810 as a library in Egyptian (English Empire) style. At one point, the library contained Sir Isaac Newton's books, although the owners were not aware of the former ownership. They were eventually purchased at bargain prices and ended up Trinity College, Cambridge.

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3579
The Regency Country House; Robinson

The library at Deene Park in Northamptonshire, England. The Elizabethan house was built in the 16th century, but the library was added around 1810. Also called the Bow Room, the library contains the Brudenell library, collected in the 16th century by Sir Thomas Tresham and his son-in-law, Sir Thomas Brudenell, 1st Earl of Cardigan. Tresham collected the latest works on architecture, mathematics, astronomy and science, Catholic theology and devotion, and a wide range of works on history and literature. The collection at one time included a manuscript of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales and the last copy of Magna Carta in private hands, but these have been sold.

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3580
The Regency Country House; Robinson

The library at Ashridge Park in Hertfordshire, England. Built in the early 19th century by architect James Wyatt, the house has an overall Gothic style, although Classic style was chosen for the principal reception rooms, including the library. The house was sold in the 1920s and has been in institutional use since.

 

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