English Country House Libraries (page 3)

 

3501
e-bragg.com
nationaltrust.org.uk

The library at Oxburgh Hall, a moated country house in Oxborough, Norfolk, England. Now owned by the National Trust, it was built around 1482 by Sir Edmund Bedingfeld. I was not able to discover when the library was built, but the house was modernized in the 1820s, and the library could have been done then. There is a really cool secret door in the library (the Bedingfelds were Catholic – there is a priests' hiding hole elsewhere in the house – and the house was confiscated and later returned to the family, and one of the dummy books in the door bears the ironic title "Rewards for Sir Henry Bedingfeld, His Loyaltie," showing some bitterness over their treatment.)

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3502
flickriver.com
flickr.com (blue pelican)

The library and "Ante-Library" at Wimpole Hall in Cambridgeshire, England. James Gibbs designed the long library in Wimpole Hall to house Lord Harley's collection of books and manuscripts - the largest (over 10,000 books) and most important ever assembled by a private individual in England. It would later form the nucleus of the British Library. By 1720, Harley's guests were able to view his massive collection of books in the five rooms built specifically to house them, and then later in the Great Library, built as a major extension to the main house. It is now well-stocked with Rudyard Kipling's works because his daughter Elsie was its last owner. After her death, she left the hall and grounds to the National Trust.

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3503
ntpl.org.uk

There are three library rooms at Attingham Park in Shrewsbury, Shropshire, England. There is an Octagon Room which was converted into a small library in 1815 and served as Lord Berwick’s private “quiet room” (not shown). Then there are the Inner Library and the Outer Library with an even bigger collection of books. Pictures of the library were hard to find as photography is not allowed inside the building.

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3504
nttreasurehunt.wordpress.com

The Library at Osterley Park on the outskirts of London, designed by Robert Adam in 1766. The second photo is of art historian Sir Kenneth Clark in the library at Osterley Park, presenting the BBC TV series Civilisation (one of my favorite history series of all time).

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3505
ntpl.org.uk

The Book Room at Canons Ashby in Northamptonshire, England. The library was created by Sir Henry Dryden 'the Antiquary', with neo-Gothic bookshelves and was built in the 1840s and 50s.

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3506
ntpl.org.uk
flickr.com (Andrew Buck)

The Library in Antony House in Cornwall, England, a smaller house built around 1720. The library Library contains books from the original Antony and Shute collections and a fine portrait collection, as well as a fireplace, bookcases, chairs and pine paneling.

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3507
pbase.com (Chris Spracklen)

The library at Killerton in Devon, England. The interior was redesigned in the 1890s and again in 1924 following a fire.

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3508
uk.ebid.net
pbase.com (Chris Spracklen)

The library at Montecute House in Devon, England. The house was built around 1698, and the room in which the library is now was originally used as a Great Chamber, where important guests were received. During the 18th century the room was shut up and in the 19th century it was completely restored in "Elizabethan style." The strapwork ceiling, panelling and bookcases all date from this period. The only original features remaining are the heraldic stained glass in the windows and the Portland stone chimney-piece. The room contains an ornate carved wooden porch installed in the library in the 1830s.

 

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